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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

5 edition of Religion, Learning and Science in the "Abbasid Period (The Cambridge History of Arabic Literature) found in the catalog.

Religion, Learning and Science in the "Abbasid Period (The Cambridge History of Arabic Literature)

  • 148 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Literary studies: classical, early & medieval,
  • World - General,
  • History - General History,
  • Language Arts & Disciplines,
  • Arabic,
  • Language,
  • General,
  • History / World,
  • Islamic Empire--Intellectual life,
  • Language Arts & Disciplines : General,
  • Literary Criticism & Collections / European

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsM. J. L. Young (Editor), J. D. Latham (Editor), R. B. Serjeant (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages611
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7714548M
    ISBN 100521028876
    ISBN 109780521028875

      The Abbasid Caliphate, which ruled most of the Muslim world from Baghdad in what is now Iraq, lasted from to was the third Islamic caliphate and overthrew the Umayyad Caliphate to take power in all but the western-most fringe of Muslim holdings at that time—Spain and Portugal, known then as the al-Andalus region.   The hypostyle and four-iwan were two of the most popular mosque architectural styles during the Abbasid period. The centrally-planned mosques came later during the Ottoman period. Mosques were more than places of worship, and prayer as the structures also served as learning centers (madrasa) for the Muslims, as well as soup kitchens for the poor.

    The Cambridge History of Arabic Literature is a series of collaborative volumes covering the field from early Islam up to the present day. Contributors from around the world explore the extraordinary diversity of that literature and how it evolved under the influence of adjacent civilizations, and .   The Abbasid and the Umayyad armies met in the Great Zab River where the former dealt a decisive blow against the latter. The Abbasid victory forced Caliph Marwan II to flee, first to Harran, a city near the modern borders of Turkey and Iraq, and then to Egypt. In Egypt he was captured and executed by Abbasid supporters.

    Abbasid Caliphate ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلْعَبَّاسِيَّة ‎ – – Black Standard [1] Abbasid. When the Abbasids overthrew the Umayyads in CE and ushered in Islam's Golden Age, ideas about gender and sexuality were central to the process by which the caliphate achieved self-definition and articulated its systems of power and thought. Nadia Maria El Cheikh's study reveals the importance of women to the writing of early Islamic history.


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Religion, Learning and Science in the "Abbasid Period (The Cambridge History of Arabic Literature) Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Religion, learning and science in the Abbasid period" is a collection of scholarly essays on those categories.

Although, largely written by Western scholars in the field, there are some nice essays from non-Western scholars. The chapter on "Arabic grammar" is excellent. The book is revealing in that it shows that Islamic scholarship was eons 5/5(1).

The five centuries of the 'Abbasid period (eighth to thirteenth centuries AD) were the golden age of Arabic literature. They saw the appearance not only of poetry and belles-lettres (which are covered in a previous volume), but also of an extensive body of writings concerned with subjects ranging from theology and law to history and the natural s: 1.

Religion, Learning and Science in the 'Abbasid Period book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.

This volume of the Cambridge History /5. Religion, Learning and Science in the 'Abbasid Period available in Hardcover, Paperback. Add to Wishlist. ISBN ISBN Pub. Date: 11/02/ Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Religion, Learning and Science in the 'Abbasid Period. by M. Young, J.

Latham, R. Serjeant | Read Publish your book with Price: $   Religion, Learning and Science in the 'Abbasid Period by M. Young,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(9).

Get this from a library. Religion, learning, and science in the ʻAbbasid period. [M J L Young; J D Latham; R B Serjeant;] -- The five centuries of the 'Abbasid period (eighth to thirteenth centuries AD) were the golden age of Arabic literature. They saw the appearance not.

RELIGION, LEARNING AND SCIENCE IN THE CABBASID PERIOD EDITED BY M. YOUNG, J. LATHAM AND R. SERJEANT 7"Abooks was granted by Henry VIII in The University has printed and published continuously since CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS CAMBRIDGE NEW YORK PORT.

al-Farabi, by Ivry in Religion, Learning & Science in the 'Abbasid Period, ch 22, Clarendon Press, Oxford — — xxxii, pp.

— no ISBNBaghdad During the Abbasid Caliphate was first published in and is, according to the author, the first attempt at a complete history and topographic outline of the city of Baghdad during the reign of the Abbasids, who ruled from to. Donald Routledge Hill, 'The Literature of Arabic Alchemy' in Religion: Learning and Science in the Abbasid Period, ed.

by M.J.L. Young, J.D. Latham and R.B. Serjeant (Cambridge University Press, ) pp. – [–]. Holmyard (ed.) The Arabic Works of Jabir ibn Hayyan, translated by Richard Russel in New York, E.P. Dutton. The Abbasid realm witnessed a brief revival under caliphs al-Nasir (r.

–) and al-Mustansir (r. –42), when Baghdad once again became the greatest center for the arts of the book in the Islamic world and the Mustansiriyya Madrasa (–33), the first college for the four canonical schools of.

During this period the Muslim world became the unrivalled intellectual centre for science, philosophy, medicine, and education as the Abbasids championed the cause of knowledge and established Darul Hukama (House of Wisdom) in Baghdad, founded by great Abbasid Caliph Harun-ar-Rashid, which was divided into two sections, one was concerned with.

The History of the Prophets and Kings (Arabic: تاريخ الرسل والملوك ‎ Tārīkh al-Rusul wa al-Mulūk), more commonly known as Tarikh al-Tabari (تاريخ الطبري) or Tarikh-i Tabari or The History of al-Tabari (Persian: تاریخ طبری ‎) is an Arabic-language historical chronicle written by the Persian historian Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari ( A.H., This coincided with the Abbasid period ( CE) which proved itself the golden period of Muslim learning.

Today the crisis is so acute observes Ali A Allawi in ‘The Crisis of Islamic. Get this from a library. Religion, learning, and science in the ʻAbbasid period. [M J L Young; J D Latham; R B Serjeant;] This volume of The Cambridge History of Arabic Literature deals with writings on learned subjects from the 'Abbasid period (eighth to thirteenth centures AD), the golden age of Arabic literature.

http:\/\/www. "Religion, learning and science in the Abbasid period" is a collection of scholarly essays on those categories.

Although, largely written by Western scholars in the field, there are some nice essays from non-Western scholars. The chapter on "Arabic grammar" is excellent.5/5.

The Abbasid dynasty descended from Muhammad’s youngest uncle, Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib (– CE), from whom the dynasty takes its name. Muhammad ibn ‘Ali, a great-grandson of Abbas, began to campaign for the return of power to the family of Muhammad, the Hashimites, in Persia during the reign of Umar II, an Umayyad caliph who ruled.

Abbasid (əbă´sĬd, ă´bəsĬd) or Abbaside (–sīd, –sĬd), Arab family descended from Abbas, the uncle of Abbasids held the caliphate from tobut they were recognized neither in Spain nor (after ) W of Egypt.

Under the Umayyad caliphs the Abbasids lived quietly until they became involved in numerous disputes, beginning early in the 8th cent. The high degree of learning and scholarship in Islam, particularly during the ʿAbbāsid period in eastern Islam and the later Umayyads in western Islam, encouraged the development of bookshops, copyists, and book dealers in large, important Islamic cities such as Damascus, Baghdad, and Córdoba.

Scholars and students spent many hours in these. Young, J. Latham, R. Serjeant Eds Religion, Learning And Science In The ` Abbasid Period Item Preview.

Art, poetry, and science flourished. The Abbasids learned from the Chinese (a llegedly from Chinese soldiers captured in battle) the art of making paper. Cheap and durable, paper became an important material for spreading literature and knowledge. Islamic Golden Age The fifth caliph of the Abbasid dynasty, Harun al-Rashid (r.

–), is.Essay. The Study of Astronomy During the medieval period, scientists in the Islamic world made many contributions to the field of astronomy.

While their work was based on ancient sources from Greece, Iran, and India, they updated methods for measuring and calculating the movement of heavenly bodies, and continued to develop models of the universe and the movements of the planets within it.The Translation of Greek Materials into Arabic, Cambridge History of Arabic Literature: Religion, Learning and Science in the Abbasid Period, Cambridge University Press, Value and the Dynamics of Being, Review of Metaphys